News

Farmer John visits Staten Island Sunday March 12

Our CSA farmer, John Krueger, is visiting Staten Island on Sunday, March 12, from 2 to about 4 p.m., at Christ Church New Brighton, 76 Franklin Ave. (two blocks up from Richmond Terrace near Gerardi's Fruit Stand). Find out about the shares, his farm, how he grows organically, and whatever else you might want to know.

This is three days before the early-bird deadline of March 15, so bring your checkbook to sign up onsite. To register ahead of time, go to the registration form.

SNAP Shares Available

Community-supported agriculture programs pay their farmers up front so that they can buy seeds and tools. Although SNAP users can’t use food stamps to pay a lump sum in February for vegetables they’ll receive in June, Christ Church can pay the farmer now and accept repayment in food stamps during the delivery season from June to November. The number of shares is limited, however—the church can cover up to three full shares or six half shares. Please contact Susan Fowler for more information: 917 734-3746.

Should you grow vegetables in soil flooded by Sandy?

We would not recommend planting in the soil that was flooded by Hurricane Sandy. Have your soil tested. Petroleum products would need some serious treatment or removal. Adding compost to the existing soil will help bind up any heavy metals which may also be of concern. The bacteria from sewage should not be an issue after about 6 months. Raised beds with new soil would be an option. Refer any specific questions to health authorities or your county Extension agent. Useful links…

What is Staten Island Community Supported Agriculture?

Staten Island Community Supported Agriculture (SICSA) is a group of Staten Islanders who buy shares in a farmer's organic vegetable and fruit* crop for the growing season. We support Circle Brook Farm (formerly Starbrite Farm) and John Krueger, the farmer, and share the risks and benefits of food production with him. Members receive organic produce every week for 24 weeks (previously 22) by purchasing share in the farmer’s harvest at the start of the growing season, when the farmer has to pay most of the expenses (seed, soil, fertilizer).